Contemporary Expression


The Pride Portraits – Faces That Made History – Gallery Talk
September 30, 2009, 12:04 pm
Filed under: artwork, LGBT History, Living An Artful Life, NCOD, Painting, Pride

 

I hope that you can bring your lunch to Vandy on the 8th and talk with us about these incredible people. The space is open to the public to drop by all month to view the work and the take away studies on each person featured. Just walk up West Side Row from Sarratt and you will find it.

More on this painting:
Bayard RustinNancy VanReece Acrylic and ink © 2009 Contemporary Expression, a div. of Carpe Diem Copyright Management Inspired by photographs in the J D’Emilo book Lost Prophet, The Live and Times of Bayard Rustin
$300 Call 615-830-8158

What: Nancy VanReece’s “The Pride Portraits” of LGBT faces in history including Del Martin, Phylis Lyon, Urvashi Vaid, Jane Wagner, Lillian Faderman, Lucy Burns, Bayard Rusting showing throughout the month of October as part of LGBT History month along with a Gallery Talk with the artist.

When: Exhibit open October 1-30,
Gallery Talk Thursday, October 8 at Noon.

Where: Office of LGBTQI Life in the K.C. Potter Center.
Euclid, 312 West Side Row

FACEBOOK EVENT RSVP

PRESS :
While many of her contemporaries may be currently obsessed with looking to the future in their expressions, Nashville artist Nancy VanReece has chosen to ground her art steadfast in the present, while looking to the horizons of the past to guide her—and her work—into the future. Meant as a celebration of the 40 year anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, Nancy’s 2009 Pride Portraits Series is not only a snapshot of where she is as an artist and a person but also the long and bumpy road that brought her to this place. With this work Nancy is showing homage to the fact that throughout history there have always been lively souls who lived boldly for the rights and privileges that we enjoy today. With each portrait in this series Nancy is acknowledging that in the landscape of her life, there is color, texture, movement and light because of the contributions of these seven individuals (Del Martin, Phylis Lyon, Urvashi Vaid, Jane Wagner, Lillian Faderman, Lucy Burns, Bayard Rustin) and many more just like them. In viewing Nancy VanReece’s expressions of abstract portraiture, she hopes to draw the viewer into a story or narrative continuity with her subjects and herself as the artist. “These are people whose unique courage and foresight have influenced not just how I view my world but how the world views me.”
No matter what phase of life she may be in Nancy has learned to always apply a basic principle to her approach to art: She needs color, texture, movement and light or she loses interest.
These fundamental elements form the cornerstone of how Nancy expresses herself and have their origins in her work on the canvas. Nancy began her career in contemporary and abstract expression in the mid- 90’s focusing on elemental and nature themes until a hand injury left her without the ability to paint for over 18 months. A retreat to Santa Fe, New Mexico in spring of 2003 renewed her body and mind with inspiration and guidance from other respected expressionists. This renewed period in Nancy’s life produced many changes in her approach to expression on canvas by encouraging her to create energy and movement in multimedia spaces through multi-layered acrylic and series of antique photographs. Nancy also adopted the method of using water in differing streams of force as well as natural texture elements with acrylic on canvas. These techniques allowed her to more fully express new ideas and inspirations through the use of movement and texture along with color and light. In 2004 and 2005 Nancy applied her new found dedication to these four essential elements to any art to several popular series on behaviors, whimsical animals and large scale landscapes. 2006 saw her interpreting show places in her memory or places she wished existed. Nancy is currently focusing on abstract expressions of people and places of import to her personal continuity and sense of history. Without what she feels to be the essential elements of expression-movement, texture, color and light-Nancy’s art would be severely handicapped. History moves us forward in time. The texture of culture, fashion, ethos and ideas make up the fabric of all history. Color has always been a powerful interpreter of emotion and light has shaped all things by shades throughout recorded time. It is Nancy VanReece’s sincere hope that her approach to the idea that a person is the sum total of all the events, people and places that went before them will resonate in these expressions. If someone walks away having learned that their own journey is an artful one, then she will have accomplished her goal. She will have helped by creating an object that tells us all the story of what has gone before in the past that made us what we are and will continue to shape us as we move forward – by F. Daniel Kent.

 

 

panoramic of portraits at the K.C. Potter Center

 



Stonewall and Pingpong Balls
June 29, 2009, 1:23 pm
Filed under: Equality, LGBT History
Back then, I was busy watching Captain Kangaroo – now what’s distracting me? What would it take to take to the street in both celebration and protest?

The Stonewall riots were a series of spontaneous, violent demonstrations against a police raid that took place in the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, at the Stonewall Inn, in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of New York City. They are frequently cited as the first instance in American history when people in the homosexual community fought back against a government-sponsored system that persecuted sexual minorities, and they have become the defining event that marked the start of the gay rights movement in the United States and around the world.

After the Stonewall riots, gays and lesbians in New York City faced gender, class, and generational obstacles to becoming a cohesive community. Within six months, two gay activist organizations were formed in New York, concentrating on confrontational tactics, and three newspapers were established to promote rights for gays and lesbians. Within a few years, gay rights organizations were founded across the U.S. and the world. On June 28, 1970, the first Gay Pride marches took place in Los Angeles and New York commemorating the anniversary of the riots. Similar marches were organized in other cities. Today, Gay Pride events are held annually throughout the world toward the end of June to mark the Stonewall riots.

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It’s Time! Equality starts at home
June 24, 2009, 1:47 pm
Filed under: Equality, LGBT History
Okay, so I am a founding member of The Tennessee Equality Project and serve on the TEP Foundation board of directors. Ultimately, however, I’m just a Tennessean, just a Nashvillian who agrees in fairness, equality and quite frankly is getting very restless waiting for local good news.

It’s Time! Equality Starts at Home and you need to participate. It’s about non discrimination, it’s about equalty treatment , its about you, your sister, your brother, your cousin, your friend, your mom and your dad. Take action, do something today.

Support a Metro Nashville non-discrimination ordinance

Contact Nashville Metro Council and urge your representatives to support a non-discrimination ordinance that includes sexual orientation and gender identity or expression for Metro government employees. Use this web form to contact the 5 Metro Council Members at Large.

And on the National Level:

Enclusive ENDA Introduced! Ask your US Representative to Become a Co-sponsor!

Use this form to contact your state representative

This week, Representative Barney Frank, joined by Reps. Tammy Baldwin and Jared Polis, introduced an inclusive version of the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA)—which would extend the existing federal law prohibiting employment discrimination to protect people on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity.
The bill was introduced by a group of bi-partisan Representatives and it is important that you contact your legislator to become a cosponsor as well. Becoming a cosponsor shows that the Representative will stand firm with our community and helps build momentum for the bill’s passage.

Okay – so a couple of clicks and you can change the world in your neighborhood and help strengthen the momentum nationwide.

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Happy Pride Nashville
June 20, 2009, 2:32 pm
Filed under: Coming Out, Equality, flip camera, LGBT History
Riverfront Park 11am-6pm
The Tenessean Feature

2 and a half minutes of Nashville Pride – I giggle a lot.



Pride Portraits Reception Announcement

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: F. Daniel Kent
Now! Here! This! Creative Services
Phone: 615.589.5835
Email: fdanielkent@comcast.net

What: Nashville Pride art reception for Nancy VanReece’s “The Pride Portraits” of LGBT faces in history including Del Martin, Phylis Lyon, Urvashi Vaid, Jane Wagner, Lillian Faderman, Lucy Burns, Bayard Rustin

When: Tuesday, June 9th, 2009 5:30p-7p
(This selection, along with 12 other VanReece works, will be on display throughout June)

Where: Ugly Mugs Coffee & Tea 1886 Eastland Avenue in Nashville, TN in the Walden building at the corner of Eastland and Chapel across the street from Rosepepper restaurant.

image: Urvashi Vaid by Nancy VanReece (c) 2009 Contemporary Expression. All rights reserved, Used by permission.

While many of her contemporaries may be currently obsessed with looking to the future in their expressions, Nashville artist Nancy VanReece has chosen to ground her art steadfast in the present, while looking to the horizons of the past to guide her—and her work—into the future.

Meant as a celebration of the 40 year anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, Nancy’s 2009 Pride Portraits Series is not only a snapshot of where she is as an artist and a person but also the long and bumpy road that brought her to this place. With this work Nancy is showing homage to the fact that throughout history there have always been lively souls who lived boldly for the rights and privileges that we enjoy today.

With each portrait in this series Nancy is acknowledging that in the landscape of her life, there is color, texture, movement and light because of the contributions of these seven individuals (Del Martin, Phylis Lyon, Urvashi Vaid, Jane Wagner, Lillian Faderman, Lucy Burns, Bayard Rustin) and many more just like them.

In viewing Nancy VanReece’s expressions of abstract portraiture, she hopes to draw the viewer into a story or narrative continuity with her subjects and herself as the artist. “These are people whose unique courage and foresight have influenced not just how I view my world but how the world views me.”

No matter what phase of life she may be in Nancy has learned to always apply a basic principle to her approach to art: She needs color, texture, movement and light or she looses interest. These fundamental elements form the cornerstone of how Nancy expresses herself and have their origins in her work on the canvas.

Nancy began her career in contemporary and abstract expression in the mid- 90’s focusing on elemental and nature themes until a hand injury left her without the ability to paint for over 18 months. A retreat to Santa Fe, New Mexico in spring of 2003 renewed her body and mind with inspiration and guidance from other respected expressionists.

This renewed period in Nancy’s life produced many changes in her approach to expression on canvas by encouraging her to create energy and movement in multimedia spaces through multi-layered acrylic and series of antique photographs. Nancy also adopted the method of using water in differing streams of force as well as natural texture elements with acrylic on canvas. These techniques allowed her to more fully express new ideas and inspirations through the use of movement and texture along with color and light.

In 2004 and 2005 Nancy applied her newfound dedication to these four essential elements to any art to several popular series on behaviors, whimsical animals and large scale landscapes. 2006 saw her interpreting show places in her memory or places she wished existed. Nancy is currently focusing on abstract expressions of people and places of import to her personal continuity and sense of history.

Without what she feels to be the essential elements of expression-movement, texture, color and light-Nancy’s art would be severely handicapped. History moves us forward in time. The texture of culture, fashion, ethos and ideas make up the fabric of all history. Color has always been a powerful interpreter of emotion and light has shaped all things by shades throughout recorded time.

It is Nancy VanReece’s sincere hope that her approach to the idea that a person is the sum total of all the events, people and places that went before them will resonate in these expressions. If someone walks away having learned that their own journey is an artful one, then she will have accomplished her goal. She will have helped by creating an object that tells us all the story of what has gone before in the past that made us what we are and will continue to shape us as we move forward.

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The Pride Portraits

The month of June marks a special pride month as it is the 40th anniversary of the Stonewall riots, a series of spontaneous, violent demonstrations against a police raid that took place in the early morning hours of June 28, 1969 at the Stonewall Inn, in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of New York City. They are frequently cited as the first instance in American history when gays and lesbians fought back against a government-sponsored system that persecuted homosexuals, and they have become the defining event that marked the start of the gay rights movement in the United States and around the world.


The Pride Portraits is a series of 7 paintings that helped lead up to and past that defining moment in 1969. These are people whose unique courage and foresight have influenced not just how I view my world but how the world views me.

Del Martin & Phyllis Lyon
diptych Nancy VanReece
Acrylic and ink
© 2009 Contemporary Expression, a div. of Carpe Diem Copyright Management
Inspired by photograph from the archives of the San Francisco Chronicle

To read more about these works visit: http://www.nancyvanreece.com/prideportraits.htm

A reception will be help by Nashville Pride on Tuesday June 9th, 2009 from 5:30-7pm at Ugly Mugs where these 7 works and others will be on display through out the month.

The works are also committed for display at the K. C. Potter House on the campus of Vanderbilt University in October for LGBT History month.

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Free Screening of the film ASK NOT
May 20, 2009, 12:27 pm
Filed under: Equality, LGBT History

Community Cinema in Nashville: Ask Not by Johnny Symons
Wednesday – May 20
Location: Conference Center at The downtown Nashville Public Library on Church Street

Ask Not This documentary by Johnny Symons explores the tangled political battles that led to the infamous “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy of the U.S. military, and reveals the personal stories of gay Americans who serve in combat under a veil of secrecy.

Join us for refreshments at 5:15, followed by the screening at 6:00 p.m.
Co-production of ITVS and NPT.

Reception at 5:15-films begins at 6:00.

To secure a seat for the FREE screening, please RSVP to rsvp@wnpt.net

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