Contemporary Expression


the watercolor doodle project
February 17, 2010, 11:21 am
Filed under: artwork, Living An Artful Life, Painting

change can hurt ( day 56 of the project )

The Watercolor Doodle of The Day Project Continues until March 21.

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Sketching Out The Possibilities

Room To Think - Sketch 2008

I have been working on a new painting for a corporate client and believe I may have it finished by the end of the week. When I work on a new project I start by sketching and doodling out memories and ideas and then take them to ink sketch and watercolor and then finally to canvas.

Room To Think - Watercolor 2008

I’m not sure when I started this pattern. I didn’t always paint this way.  When I first started expressing and creating through color, I simply started. There was nothing in between the color the arm and the canvas.  This rendered great things and all of them have long since sold and hopefully continue to bring spontaneity to their owners.

Room To Think - Acrylic on Canvas 2008

In the last few years I’ve become more contemplative about my contemporary expressions. The spontaneity is in the work but the thoughtful way in which I play with the color has brought a maturity to my process and I am happy about it.

As I have been searching for employment I have found the same personality in my process.  I’m carefully considering options based on memory and sketching out the possibilities before moving to canvas.

I received last week a note from a potential new life that simply said; “Thank you!” (exclamation point included) Honestly, it made my day.

I received a form letter for another local nonprofit gig that said; “if one of the top 10 candidates, you will be notified in 4-6 wks to schedule an interview.” Here is the thing, two months from now when you contact those top 10 candidates, they will be in other jobs.  – At least I hope so!

So what have I learned to start the new year? Memory, time, and spontaneity can serve you well when mixed together.

How are you approaching your plans this year? Want to share some of your tips and tricks for others to learn from? Leave a comment and let’s chat.


Please visit my new virtual art galleries
October 22, 2009, 12:24 am
Filed under: artwork, Painting, The Art Files

 www.nancyvanreece.com

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making the move
October 13, 2009, 11:51 pm
Filed under: artwork, Living An Artful Life, Painting

"Dreamcatchers" painting by Nancy VanReece (c) 2006 Contemporary Expression acrylic and ink on canvas 36" x 48"

"Dreamcatchers" painting by Nancy VanReece (c) 2006 Contemporary Expression acrylic and ink on canvas 36" x 48"

After 4 years with Blogger, I made the switch over to WordPress.  Don’t miss out on some of the posts in the archives!  Simply use the category cloud to your left to find topics that interest you.
 



The Pride Portraits – Faces That Made History – Gallery Talk
September 30, 2009, 12:04 pm
Filed under: artwork, LGBT History, Living An Artful Life, NCOD, Painting, Pride

 

I hope that you can bring your lunch to Vandy on the 8th and talk with us about these incredible people. The space is open to the public to drop by all month to view the work and the take away studies on each person featured. Just walk up West Side Row from Sarratt and you will find it.

More on this painting:
Bayard RustinNancy VanReece Acrylic and ink © 2009 Contemporary Expression, a div. of Carpe Diem Copyright Management Inspired by photographs in the J D’Emilo book Lost Prophet, The Live and Times of Bayard Rustin
$300 Call 615-830-8158

What: Nancy VanReece’s “The Pride Portraits” of LGBT faces in history including Del Martin, Phylis Lyon, Urvashi Vaid, Jane Wagner, Lillian Faderman, Lucy Burns, Bayard Rusting showing throughout the month of October as part of LGBT History month along with a Gallery Talk with the artist.

When: Exhibit open October 1-30,
Gallery Talk Thursday, October 8 at Noon.

Where: Office of LGBTQI Life in the K.C. Potter Center.
Euclid, 312 West Side Row

FACEBOOK EVENT RSVP

PRESS :
While many of her contemporaries may be currently obsessed with looking to the future in their expressions, Nashville artist Nancy VanReece has chosen to ground her art steadfast in the present, while looking to the horizons of the past to guide her—and her work—into the future. Meant as a celebration of the 40 year anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, Nancy’s 2009 Pride Portraits Series is not only a snapshot of where she is as an artist and a person but also the long and bumpy road that brought her to this place. With this work Nancy is showing homage to the fact that throughout history there have always been lively souls who lived boldly for the rights and privileges that we enjoy today. With each portrait in this series Nancy is acknowledging that in the landscape of her life, there is color, texture, movement and light because of the contributions of these seven individuals (Del Martin, Phylis Lyon, Urvashi Vaid, Jane Wagner, Lillian Faderman, Lucy Burns, Bayard Rustin) and many more just like them. In viewing Nancy VanReece’s expressions of abstract portraiture, she hopes to draw the viewer into a story or narrative continuity with her subjects and herself as the artist. “These are people whose unique courage and foresight have influenced not just how I view my world but how the world views me.”
No matter what phase of life she may be in Nancy has learned to always apply a basic principle to her approach to art: She needs color, texture, movement and light or she loses interest.
These fundamental elements form the cornerstone of how Nancy expresses herself and have their origins in her work on the canvas. Nancy began her career in contemporary and abstract expression in the mid- 90’s focusing on elemental and nature themes until a hand injury left her without the ability to paint for over 18 months. A retreat to Santa Fe, New Mexico in spring of 2003 renewed her body and mind with inspiration and guidance from other respected expressionists. This renewed period in Nancy’s life produced many changes in her approach to expression on canvas by encouraging her to create energy and movement in multimedia spaces through multi-layered acrylic and series of antique photographs. Nancy also adopted the method of using water in differing streams of force as well as natural texture elements with acrylic on canvas. These techniques allowed her to more fully express new ideas and inspirations through the use of movement and texture along with color and light. In 2004 and 2005 Nancy applied her new found dedication to these four essential elements to any art to several popular series on behaviors, whimsical animals and large scale landscapes. 2006 saw her interpreting show places in her memory or places she wished existed. Nancy is currently focusing on abstract expressions of people and places of import to her personal continuity and sense of history. Without what she feels to be the essential elements of expression-movement, texture, color and light-Nancy’s art would be severely handicapped. History moves us forward in time. The texture of culture, fashion, ethos and ideas make up the fabric of all history. Color has always been a powerful interpreter of emotion and light has shaped all things by shades throughout recorded time. It is Nancy VanReece’s sincere hope that her approach to the idea that a person is the sum total of all the events, people and places that went before them will resonate in these expressions. If someone walks away having learned that their own journey is an artful one, then she will have accomplished her goal. She will have helped by creating an object that tells us all the story of what has gone before in the past that made us what we are and will continue to shape us as we move forward – by F. Daniel Kent.

 

 

panoramic of portraits at the K.C. Potter Center

 



Life Comes in Layers and Builds With Color
August 11, 2009, 1:42 pm
Filed under: Frist Center, Painting, The Art Files

There is a wonderful show up a The Frist Center for the Visual Arts.
Chuck Close Prints Process and Collaboration
June 26–September 13, 2009
I was first introduced to Chuck Close’s work on a visit to the Art Institute of Chicago several years ago. I was amazed at his “fingerprint” paintings. I was thrilled to see that The Frist had brought a collection of his prints for view.
I was thrilled to see that the process was part of the exhibition. As we were reading and learning and viewing I was struck by the profound nature of the layering of life.
Each experience and every encounter brings color and layer to the picture of our life. As we grow and learn and rally life into our world our reality is effected.
What you see at the Frist is profoundly different when you realize that everything Chuck Close painted or carved or printed after 1988 he did after “The Event”.

“The Event”
On December 7, 1988, Close felt a strange pain in his chest. That day he was in New York about to give an art award. He begged to present first, went on stage, quickly read his speech and then ran to the hospital. Within a few hours, Close was paralyzed from the neck down. At first the doctors were confused but eventually they diagnosed a rare spinal artery collapse. Close called that day, “The Event”. For months Close was in rehab strengthening his muscles; he soon had slight movement in his arms and could walk, yet only for a few steps. He has relied on a wheelchair since. However, Close continued to paint on with a brush strapped onto his wrist with tape, creating large portraits in low-resolution grid squares created by an assistant.
Do you have an event in your life that has added the layer of color and texture and movement that has summoned your soul to push forward, to move on, to paint your life and your vision, no matter what?

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Pride Portraits Reception Announcement

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: F. Daniel Kent
Now! Here! This! Creative Services
Phone: 615.589.5835
Email: fdanielkent@comcast.net

What: Nashville Pride art reception for Nancy VanReece’s “The Pride Portraits” of LGBT faces in history including Del Martin, Phylis Lyon, Urvashi Vaid, Jane Wagner, Lillian Faderman, Lucy Burns, Bayard Rustin

When: Tuesday, June 9th, 2009 5:30p-7p
(This selection, along with 12 other VanReece works, will be on display throughout June)

Where: Ugly Mugs Coffee & Tea 1886 Eastland Avenue in Nashville, TN in the Walden building at the corner of Eastland and Chapel across the street from Rosepepper restaurant.

image: Urvashi Vaid by Nancy VanReece (c) 2009 Contemporary Expression. All rights reserved, Used by permission.

While many of her contemporaries may be currently obsessed with looking to the future in their expressions, Nashville artist Nancy VanReece has chosen to ground her art steadfast in the present, while looking to the horizons of the past to guide her—and her work—into the future.

Meant as a celebration of the 40 year anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, Nancy’s 2009 Pride Portraits Series is not only a snapshot of where she is as an artist and a person but also the long and bumpy road that brought her to this place. With this work Nancy is showing homage to the fact that throughout history there have always been lively souls who lived boldly for the rights and privileges that we enjoy today.

With each portrait in this series Nancy is acknowledging that in the landscape of her life, there is color, texture, movement and light because of the contributions of these seven individuals (Del Martin, Phylis Lyon, Urvashi Vaid, Jane Wagner, Lillian Faderman, Lucy Burns, Bayard Rustin) and many more just like them.

In viewing Nancy VanReece’s expressions of abstract portraiture, she hopes to draw the viewer into a story or narrative continuity with her subjects and herself as the artist. “These are people whose unique courage and foresight have influenced not just how I view my world but how the world views me.”

No matter what phase of life she may be in Nancy has learned to always apply a basic principle to her approach to art: She needs color, texture, movement and light or she looses interest. These fundamental elements form the cornerstone of how Nancy expresses herself and have their origins in her work on the canvas.

Nancy began her career in contemporary and abstract expression in the mid- 90’s focusing on elemental and nature themes until a hand injury left her without the ability to paint for over 18 months. A retreat to Santa Fe, New Mexico in spring of 2003 renewed her body and mind with inspiration and guidance from other respected expressionists.

This renewed period in Nancy’s life produced many changes in her approach to expression on canvas by encouraging her to create energy and movement in multimedia spaces through multi-layered acrylic and series of antique photographs. Nancy also adopted the method of using water in differing streams of force as well as natural texture elements with acrylic on canvas. These techniques allowed her to more fully express new ideas and inspirations through the use of movement and texture along with color and light.

In 2004 and 2005 Nancy applied her newfound dedication to these four essential elements to any art to several popular series on behaviors, whimsical animals and large scale landscapes. 2006 saw her interpreting show places in her memory or places she wished existed. Nancy is currently focusing on abstract expressions of people and places of import to her personal continuity and sense of history.

Without what she feels to be the essential elements of expression-movement, texture, color and light-Nancy’s art would be severely handicapped. History moves us forward in time. The texture of culture, fashion, ethos and ideas make up the fabric of all history. Color has always been a powerful interpreter of emotion and light has shaped all things by shades throughout recorded time.

It is Nancy VanReece’s sincere hope that her approach to the idea that a person is the sum total of all the events, people and places that went before them will resonate in these expressions. If someone walks away having learned that their own journey is an artful one, then she will have accomplished her goal. She will have helped by creating an object that tells us all the story of what has gone before in the past that made us what we are and will continue to shape us as we move forward.

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