Contemporary Expression


The Pride Portraits – Faces That Made History – Gallery Talk
September 30, 2009, 12:04 pm
Filed under: artwork, LGBT History, Living An Artful Life, NCOD, Painting, Pride

 

I hope that you can bring your lunch to Vandy on the 8th and talk with us about these incredible people. The space is open to the public to drop by all month to view the work and the take away studies on each person featured. Just walk up West Side Row from Sarratt and you will find it.

More on this painting:
Bayard RustinNancy VanReece Acrylic and ink © 2009 Contemporary Expression, a div. of Carpe Diem Copyright Management Inspired by photographs in the J D’Emilo book Lost Prophet, The Live and Times of Bayard Rustin
$300 Call 615-830-8158

What: Nancy VanReece’s “The Pride Portraits” of LGBT faces in history including Del Martin, Phylis Lyon, Urvashi Vaid, Jane Wagner, Lillian Faderman, Lucy Burns, Bayard Rusting showing throughout the month of October as part of LGBT History month along with a Gallery Talk with the artist.

When: Exhibit open October 1-30,
Gallery Talk Thursday, October 8 at Noon.

Where: Office of LGBTQI Life in the K.C. Potter Center.
Euclid, 312 West Side Row

FACEBOOK EVENT RSVP

PRESS :
While many of her contemporaries may be currently obsessed with looking to the future in their expressions, Nashville artist Nancy VanReece has chosen to ground her art steadfast in the present, while looking to the horizons of the past to guide her—and her work—into the future. Meant as a celebration of the 40 year anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, Nancy’s 2009 Pride Portraits Series is not only a snapshot of where she is as an artist and a person but also the long and bumpy road that brought her to this place. With this work Nancy is showing homage to the fact that throughout history there have always been lively souls who lived boldly for the rights and privileges that we enjoy today. With each portrait in this series Nancy is acknowledging that in the landscape of her life, there is color, texture, movement and light because of the contributions of these seven individuals (Del Martin, Phylis Lyon, Urvashi Vaid, Jane Wagner, Lillian Faderman, Lucy Burns, Bayard Rustin) and many more just like them. In viewing Nancy VanReece’s expressions of abstract portraiture, she hopes to draw the viewer into a story or narrative continuity with her subjects and herself as the artist. “These are people whose unique courage and foresight have influenced not just how I view my world but how the world views me.”
No matter what phase of life she may be in Nancy has learned to always apply a basic principle to her approach to art: She needs color, texture, movement and light or she loses interest.
These fundamental elements form the cornerstone of how Nancy expresses herself and have their origins in her work on the canvas. Nancy began her career in contemporary and abstract expression in the mid- 90’s focusing on elemental and nature themes until a hand injury left her without the ability to paint for over 18 months. A retreat to Santa Fe, New Mexico in spring of 2003 renewed her body and mind with inspiration and guidance from other respected expressionists. This renewed period in Nancy’s life produced many changes in her approach to expression on canvas by encouraging her to create energy and movement in multimedia spaces through multi-layered acrylic and series of antique photographs. Nancy also adopted the method of using water in differing streams of force as well as natural texture elements with acrylic on canvas. These techniques allowed her to more fully express new ideas and inspirations through the use of movement and texture along with color and light. In 2004 and 2005 Nancy applied her new found dedication to these four essential elements to any art to several popular series on behaviors, whimsical animals and large scale landscapes. 2006 saw her interpreting show places in her memory or places she wished existed. Nancy is currently focusing on abstract expressions of people and places of import to her personal continuity and sense of history. Without what she feels to be the essential elements of expression-movement, texture, color and light-Nancy’s art would be severely handicapped. History moves us forward in time. The texture of culture, fashion, ethos and ideas make up the fabric of all history. Color has always been a powerful interpreter of emotion and light has shaped all things by shades throughout recorded time. It is Nancy VanReece’s sincere hope that her approach to the idea that a person is the sum total of all the events, people and places that went before them will resonate in these expressions. If someone walks away having learned that their own journey is an artful one, then she will have accomplished her goal. She will have helped by creating an object that tells us all the story of what has gone before in the past that made us what we are and will continue to shape us as we move forward – by F. Daniel Kent.

 

 

panoramic of portraits at the K.C. Potter Center

 

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Pride Portraits Reception Announcement

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: F. Daniel Kent
Now! Here! This! Creative Services
Phone: 615.589.5835
Email: fdanielkent@comcast.net

What: Nashville Pride art reception for Nancy VanReece’s “The Pride Portraits” of LGBT faces in history including Del Martin, Phylis Lyon, Urvashi Vaid, Jane Wagner, Lillian Faderman, Lucy Burns, Bayard Rustin

When: Tuesday, June 9th, 2009 5:30p-7p
(This selection, along with 12 other VanReece works, will be on display throughout June)

Where: Ugly Mugs Coffee & Tea 1886 Eastland Avenue in Nashville, TN in the Walden building at the corner of Eastland and Chapel across the street from Rosepepper restaurant.

image: Urvashi Vaid by Nancy VanReece (c) 2009 Contemporary Expression. All rights reserved, Used by permission.

While many of her contemporaries may be currently obsessed with looking to the future in their expressions, Nashville artist Nancy VanReece has chosen to ground her art steadfast in the present, while looking to the horizons of the past to guide her—and her work—into the future.

Meant as a celebration of the 40 year anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, Nancy’s 2009 Pride Portraits Series is not only a snapshot of where she is as an artist and a person but also the long and bumpy road that brought her to this place. With this work Nancy is showing homage to the fact that throughout history there have always been lively souls who lived boldly for the rights and privileges that we enjoy today.

With each portrait in this series Nancy is acknowledging that in the landscape of her life, there is color, texture, movement and light because of the contributions of these seven individuals (Del Martin, Phylis Lyon, Urvashi Vaid, Jane Wagner, Lillian Faderman, Lucy Burns, Bayard Rustin) and many more just like them.

In viewing Nancy VanReece’s expressions of abstract portraiture, she hopes to draw the viewer into a story or narrative continuity with her subjects and herself as the artist. “These are people whose unique courage and foresight have influenced not just how I view my world but how the world views me.”

No matter what phase of life she may be in Nancy has learned to always apply a basic principle to her approach to art: She needs color, texture, movement and light or she looses interest. These fundamental elements form the cornerstone of how Nancy expresses herself and have their origins in her work on the canvas.

Nancy began her career in contemporary and abstract expression in the mid- 90’s focusing on elemental and nature themes until a hand injury left her without the ability to paint for over 18 months. A retreat to Santa Fe, New Mexico in spring of 2003 renewed her body and mind with inspiration and guidance from other respected expressionists.

This renewed period in Nancy’s life produced many changes in her approach to expression on canvas by encouraging her to create energy and movement in multimedia spaces through multi-layered acrylic and series of antique photographs. Nancy also adopted the method of using water in differing streams of force as well as natural texture elements with acrylic on canvas. These techniques allowed her to more fully express new ideas and inspirations through the use of movement and texture along with color and light.

In 2004 and 2005 Nancy applied her newfound dedication to these four essential elements to any art to several popular series on behaviors, whimsical animals and large scale landscapes. 2006 saw her interpreting show places in her memory or places she wished existed. Nancy is currently focusing on abstract expressions of people and places of import to her personal continuity and sense of history.

Without what she feels to be the essential elements of expression-movement, texture, color and light-Nancy’s art would be severely handicapped. History moves us forward in time. The texture of culture, fashion, ethos and ideas make up the fabric of all history. Color has always been a powerful interpreter of emotion and light has shaped all things by shades throughout recorded time.

It is Nancy VanReece’s sincere hope that her approach to the idea that a person is the sum total of all the events, people and places that went before them will resonate in these expressions. If someone walks away having learned that their own journey is an artful one, then she will have accomplished her goal. She will have helped by creating an object that tells us all the story of what has gone before in the past that made us what we are and will continue to shape us as we move forward.

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Reflections from MILK

7.7.08 watercolor by Nancy VanReece (c) 2008 Contemporary Expression, a div. of Carpe Diem Copyright Management

I have been profoundly moved by a story. It’s not someone else’s story. It’s my own. Reflecting on life has been literally blinding for me lately.

“Am I doing the greatest amount of good?”- This question was raised recently and it rang loudly. Am I, in this new dawn of hope and hard work, where I need to be? Am I using the talent, creative skill and knowledge I have accumulated for what matters most to my family? My objective is to find a new beginning that embraces the truth that the Grand Canyon was not built with a giant tsunami but rather a river, rushing on as rivers do.

Why is any single story story relevant? What can one person do? What is it that must be done? What is it than can be done today? There are so many of us in Nashville, TN that have worked so very hard to make this a city that we want to live in, a place where we can be proud of our unique and diverse backgrounds, cultures and core values. Like any city, we citizens want great schools, clean streets, green spaces, good jobs and fantastic art to motivate us further.

I really believe that we are at the dawn of individuals rising up to understand that their story is part of that rushing river. We need everyone to do what they can do each and everyday to move the water. It’s not just another gay story, or a civil rights struggle or a cry for simple dignity, it’s a human story. It’s our story, our struggle, our cry.

To Do List:
1. Learn more about your local government at this link . Make it your New Year’s Resolution to get to know more of your county or city officials in 2009. Prepare the way for progress in your community.
2. Join one of the TEP our county committees. They are throughout the State. If you would like to get involved with the committee closest to you or start one in your county, contact info@tnep.org .

You can not live on HOPE alone, but you can not live without it. And you, and you and you, have got to give them HOPE” – Harvey Milk

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Guest Blog on Grand Divisions
July 21, 2008, 2:58 pm
Filed under: Coming Out, Equality, Pride, TEP

Read my guest blog from Saturday July 19,2008

http://grand-divisions.blogspot.com/



Civil Unions in Mexico City
November 10, 2006, 4:19 pm
Filed under: Coming Out, Equality, LGBT History, Pride
Do you know this man?
Mexico City’s assembly on Thursday (Nov 9, 2006) passed legislation to legally recognize gay civil unions in the capital, the first such vote by a legislative body in the history of the conservative, predominantly Roman Catholic country.


VanReece’s on CNN

Yes – that was us on CNN
A very personal debate
Same-sex marriage issue is close to home for Tennessee couple
By John King CNN
Tuesday, June 6, 2006; Posted: 7:32 a.m. EDT


The CNN crew was fair and kind during their visit. We talked about so many things, including fairness in taxation, but I guess it should be of no surprise that they took the religion angle. If this is the story then why doesn’t the media debate the separation of church and state as it relates to current issues?

The Church Street Freedom Press Story Tells More about How this all happened
and see the story the the
Human Rights Campaign Foundation Site
To read more about why this issue matters please visit
VOTENOTN.COM or HRC.ORG



June is Pride Month – Time to Brush Up
June 2, 2006, 6:44 pm
Filed under: Coming Out, community building, Equality, LGBT History, Pride




Brush up
as published in Church Street Freeodm Press June 1, 2006 issue

I found out recently that the term “brush up” was a gardening term. It is a helpful skill. Rather than staking large tall plants such as tomatoes and dahlias and in order to get smaller plants up off the ground, the gardener will take brush twigs and stick them in the ground to then guide up or tie up the loose plant growings. This is called “brushing up”.

I’ve also looked through my collection of art brushes lately to see what of the most ancient of tools must finally be put aside. If you have looked at the price of good brushes lately you’ll know why this is a very hard task.

The brushing aside; the brushing up; giving the brush to a brush. It all seemed somehow important to share with you as we going into Pride month. Honestly, when is the last time you brushed up on your GLBT history? Living an artful life require a since of history and roots to build upon. As a community here in Nashville we are developing our own history as a honest and playful group of citizens ready to volunteer and serve and give back. No mater how old you are or from what direction you came to it, you’ll always remember your first Pride. Keep in mind that this year for many is that special year for them, if you have been around in Nashville over the past twenty years or so you need to find them and give them a since of history.

TEP’s Marriage Equality Project will have opportunities at their booth on June 3rd for couples to sit and tell their “how we met” stories. If you have a partner, come by and tell your story. If you are looking for a partner then a visit by the booth to hear these stories is a must.

There are good books out now of our national and world wide history. Go over to Outloud Books in Nashville this month and pick up a book that will help you brush up. Two of my favorite books that I recommend are: To Believe In Women, What Lesbians Have Done For America and Chloe Plus Olivia : An Anthology of Lesbian Literature from the 17th Century to the Present both by Lillian Faderman and Virtual Equality by Urvashi Viad.

The very act of brushing up in the garden allows the air to circulate around the plant and the support allows it to strengthen and grow taller. The allegory is obvious. In our pursuit of artful living, let’s remind each other of our history, let’s celebrate our future and hold each other up in the process.